From WGBH to “Camera Three”

From Paul Noble — 2003 John Musilli was one of the original ten in the Scholars ’58 crew arriving in Boston in June, 1957. Fresh from graduation at Seton Hall University, this Paterson, New Jersey, native was one of the best-prepared and most-talented production people ever to climb the stairs at 84 Massachusetts Avenue. John…

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Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice (1950s)

By Steve Gilford Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice (LECJ) was a series funded by the US Department of Justice for in-service training of police officers in the New England area. James Patrick Kelly [the host] was one of the most colorful people to ever be employed by WGBH. Policemen, as a group, are some of…

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Then and Now (1955-2000)

From Don Hallock The Buildings Then: The station in 1958, occupying a rather dusty second and third floor roller-skating rink in an old brick building located opposite MIT at 84 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge. (Photo by Brooks Leffler.) In 2000, WGBH sprawled over extensive real estate near Harvard. This is the main studio building at 125…

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Quo vadis WGBH (1946-2000)

From Don Hallock: It may surprise you to know how many places the station has called home. WGBH’s origins were in a converted skating rink on the second floor of 84 Mass. Ave. and the office spaces on the third, were the first home of WGBH from 1955 to 1961.

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The original dream factory — Mass Ave. Studio A (1950s)

For years, the original Studio A at 84 Massachusetts Avenue was a truly magical place. So many careers were launched, or at least nurtured, its environment. It’s magic blossomed from the drive to produce programming that one could feel pride in, with the ongoing and exhilarating drive to overcome obstacles, with the almost mythic experience of being forced by necessity to achieve the impossible through sheer persistence and ingenuity.

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Gifts and Reminiscences

From Don Hallock “There you stood, on the edge of your feather, …. expecting to fly.” —Neil Young Well, we’ve shared in one hell of an affair! And if the events of the year 2000 are any indication, the romance is very far from over. For many of us, the feather’s edge came early in…

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A Viable Alternative to the “Vast Wasteland”

From Larry Creshkoff — 2000 In his piece, One Way to Run a Railroad, Ray Wilding-White observes that WGBH “…was made a reality with hairpins and bailing-wire by the heroic efforts of a bunch of dedicated, overworked and underpaid young maniacs who hardly knew a microphone from a zebra when they started on radio and…

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40 years with ‘GBH

From Michael Ambrosino — 2000 My first visit to WGBH was in the fall of 1955, just after TV had gone on the air at 84 Mass Ave. in Cambridge. I was at work developing a TV master plan for the University of Connecticut at the time, and wanted a tour of one of the…

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NOVA: From the beginning (1970s)

By Ben Shedd I’m part of the group from the 1970s at ‘GBH, when NOVA was in some ways almost a separate unit at the station. It’s wonderful to learn about the history of WGBH and see why such grand programming has come from the people who worked there through the decades. I’m glad to…

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Footprints in your heart

From Rocky Coe – 1999 To Larry Creshkoff on the occasion of his seventy fifth birthday I remember a very exciting evening in a funky old building on Massachusetts Avenue in Cambridge when I switched on the lights in the little glassed-in room we then called studio B and you cued the cameras and the…

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Relics from the Fire

Text by Don Hallock A small collection of memorabilia which survived the 1961 fire. This brass plaque adorned the entrance to the 84 Massachusetts Avenue studios. We who worked there walked past it almost every day of the year, where it was affixed to the column just left of the front door (circled in the…

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One Way to Run a Railroad (1946-59)

From Ray Wilding-White: The station was made reality by a bunch of dedicated, overworked and underpaid young maniacs who hardly knew a microphone from a zebra when they started on radio. I know. I was there.

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