We have begun planning the next reunion, and we need your help! In order to make sure it will be another experience to remember, we need to know your preferences.

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Larry Creshkoff’s personal papers are fascinating as they document his professional career from his days at Harvard, onto LICBC and WGBH, to his time after he left WGBH in 1957.

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Michael Ambrosino — the creator of NOVA — describes his early years at WGBH, an era of live and live-on-tape TV productions at the 84 Massachusetts Avenue studio in Cambridge. This series presents authorized interviews with early producers and directors for Boston’s innovative public television and radio stations. He was interviewed on June 19, 1998…

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From “The first 24 years: A somewhat random compendium of milestones along the way” 1836 John Lowell Jr., leaves a bequest creating free “public lectures for the benefit of the citizens of Boston.” 1946 The Lowell Institute forms a cooperative venture with six Boston colleges (spearheaded by Ralph Lowell) to broadcast educational programs on commercial…

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From Larry Creshkoff [This is] a song from the past. It’s sung to the tune of "There is nothing like a dame" (from South Pacific) and was performed for the first (and only) time at the Christmas party of the Lowell Institute Cooperative Broadcasting Council staff in the library of the building at 28 Newbury…

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From Don Hallock: It may surprise you to know how many places the station has called home. WGBH’s origins were in a converted skating rink on the second floor of 84 Mass. Ave. and the office spaces on the third, were the first home of WGBH from 1955 to 1961.

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From Larry Creshkoff — 2000 In his piece, [intlink id=”1050″ type=”post”]One Way to Run a Railroad[/intlink], Ray Wilding-White observes that WGBH “…was made a reality with hairpins and bailing-wire by the heroic efforts of a bunch of dedicated, overworked and underpaid young maniacs who hardly knew a microphone from a zebra when they started on…

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From Ray Wilding-White: The station was made reality by a bunch of dedicated, overworked and underpaid young maniacs who hardly knew a microphone from a zebra when they started on radio. I know. I was there.

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